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APA - Action On Podoconiosis Association || What Is Podo?

Podoconiosis is a modern, silent public health disaster made up of hundreds of thousands of men, women and children suffering the shame of skin disease, most with no help and no voice

Podoconiosis is a modern, silent public health disaster made up of hundreds of thousands of men, women and children suffering the shame of skin disease, most with no help and no voice

Podoconiosis

Podoconiosis (“Podo”, or Endemic, Non-Filarial Lower-Leg Elephantiasis) is a non-infectious disease caused by exposure of bare feet to particular soil types.

Left untreated, it results in progressive swelling and radical disfigurement of the lower legs and feet.

Most patients are those who work barefoot in the fields

Particularly on red clay soils in upland volcanic areas.

The soil type thought to be associated with the disease covers approximately one-fifth of Ethiopia and the fertility of the soil in such areas attracts an agricultural population of 20.5 million people.

Podoconiosis (Endemic Non-Filarial Elephantiasis)

Podoconiosis (“Podo”, or Endemic, Non-Filarial Lower-Leg Elephantiasis) is a non-infectious disease caused by exposure of bare feet to particular soil types.

Left untreated, it results in progressive swelling and radical disfigurement of the lower legs and feet.

Podoconiosis is mostly a disease of people who work barefoot in the fields

Particularly on red clay soils in upland volcanic areas.

The soil type thought to be associated with the disease covers approximately one-fifth of Ethiopia and the fertility of the soil in such areas attracts an agricultural population of 20.5 million people.

Soil particles penetrate through the cracks in thick, dry skin on the feet

These particles then appear to react directly with lymphatic vessel walls.

This leads to failure of the lymphatic system in the lower legs, chronic inflammatory response and elephantiasis.

Ethiopia has the highest total number of cases per country

Podoconiosis is widespread in highland areas of tropical Africa, Central America and northern India.

However, in Ethiopia, over 11 million people (18% of the population) are at risk through exposure to the irritant soil and it is estimated that at least 1.6 million people are affected.

The World Health Organisation estimates that Ethiopia loses 200 million dollars every year because of the lost work hours of sufferers.

Soil particles penetrate through the cracks in thick, dry skin on the feet

These particles then appear to react directly with lymphatic vessel walls.

This leads to failure of the lymphatic system in the lower legs, chronic inflammatory response and elephantiasis.

Ethiopia has the highest total number of cases per country

Podoconiosis is widespread in highland areas of tropical Africa, Central America and northern India.

However, in Ethiopia, over 11 million people (18% of the population) are at risk through exposure to the irritant soil and it is estimated that at least 1.6 million people are affected.

The World Health Organisation estimates that Ethiopia loses 200 million dollars every year because of the lost work hours of sufferers.

A variety of skin changes occur in the various stages of Podo

At first, sufferers often see the development of roughened projections on the surface. Limbs in the later stages of the disease display a wide variety and severity of:

Hyperkeratosis – Dramatic dryness of the skin surface

Lymphoedema – Swelling of the limb

Fibrosis – Those with chronic Podo, lasting years, often develop hard nodules and out-growths

Tragically, it's not just about physical suffering

The disease is widely perceived to be infectious, resulting in significant stigmatism amongst sufferers, who are frequently ostracised from their families and communities, lonely and treated as outcasts.

A variety of skin changes occur in the various stages of Podo

At first, sufferers often see the development of roughened projections on the surface. Limbs in the later stages of the disease display a wide variety and severity of:

Hyperkeratosis – Dramatic dryness of the skin surface

Lymphoedema – Swelling of the limb

Fibrosis – Those with chronic Podo, lasting years, often develop hard nodules and out-growths

Tragically, it's not just about physical suffering

The disease is widely perceived to be infectious, resulting in significant stigmatism amongst sufferers, who are frequently ostracised from their families and communities, lonely and treated as outcasts.

Sufferers often cannot work and earn a living, attend school or marry

They are typically in constant pain and discomfort from the condition and can smell offensively through chronic infection.

Only the fortunate receive family support. Some die early through starvation or infection.

However, without help, all are destined to a miserable and deprived existence.

Sufferers often cannot work and earn a living, attend school or marry

They are typically in constant pain and discomfort from the condition and can smell offensively through chronic infection

Only the fortunate receive family support. Some die early through starvation or infection.

However, without help, all are destined to a miserable and deprived existence.